A theory of fame

 Ciaran in shirt by Villain and Levi 511s

Ciaran in shirt by Villain and Levi 511s

Photos by Ivan Rakhmanin

Host Briony Somers

Despite it's transient nature, fame will always reveal the essence of our time. Whether it's through the prominent, cultural figures or through the landscape of our public space, the idea of fame unwittingly exposes our attitudes towards celebrity and it's power in society. But has fame shifted from claiming a national and political resonance to a more personal and global one? What constitutes fame in the modern era?

In this episode, we examine the complexities of fame with Ciaran O'Neil, Ussher assistant professor in 19th century history, Trinity College Dublin. By exploring how fame has changed throughout history we consider how its cultural currency has evolved from literature to music, fashion and politics.   

After a quick call on Dame st. we met in the Trinity Alumni room for a pot of Fortnum and Mason Lapsang Souchong to discuss how fame has influenced our public space, it's significance within the fashion industry and it's shifting relationship with gender.

 

AVAILABLE TO DOWNLOAD ON ITUNES

3.jpg
 

“We are nothing if we’re not reinventing ourselves. To be the same thing is to be staid, irrelevant.” - Ciaran

 
 
 Phone,  Diavo x, Ericsson (1978)

Phone, Diavox, Ericsson (1978)

“Too often we look at FAME as accidental, when in fact it’s almost always selective, opportunistic.” - CIARAN

IMG_3661.jpg
 
 

“For power to actually accommodate (those) who are excluded, the nature of it has to change.” –  BRIONY

hg513BlA.jpeg

“Part of celebrity isn’t just about being well known but also about being personally known as an individual... Your taste, your style  etc – Briony

 Fame, Andy Warhol, (2018) €1.20

Fame, Andy Warhol, (2018) €1.20

AUDREY Hepburn and MARILYN Monroe were doing the exact same thing as Warhol, using the power structures that WERE in front of you, and subverting them.” - CIARAN

 Ciaran in Levi 511s and shoes by Camper

Ciaran in Levi 511s and shoes by Camper

“We no longer make statues to people, because we (can) no longer bring ourselves to fix our identities.” - CIARAN

 Luncheon magazine, Spring/Summer 2017. The iconic hotspot Café de Flore was named after a statue across the road and over its lifespan has houses both literary and fashion celebrities

Luncheon magazine, Spring/Summer 2017. The iconic hotspot Café de Flore was named after a statue across the road and over its lifespan has houses both literary and fashion celebrities

“THE Fashion community is reclaiming that cultural capital (of Cafe de FlorÉ) - they’re also doing that aggressively. It’s a power grab, a way of accessing fame that is not yours by right. You’re associating yourself to it.” - Ciaran 

IMG_3792.jpg
 

“If you can recognise someone by their silhouette - that’s true fame” - CIARAN

 
 Statue of historian William Edward Hartpole Lecky, Trinity College

Statue of historian William Edward Hartpole Lecky, Trinity College

“It tell us something about our times: who gets to be the famous person” –  Ciaran

2.jpg
IMG_3694.jpg
 
 
Louise Hynes